Intel Security Study Reveals 40 Percent of Singapore Travelers Will Risk Using An Unsecured Wi-Fi Connection

Intel Security Study Reveals 40 Percent of Singapore Travelers Will Risk Using An Unsecured Wi-Fi Connection

Email, Geo-Tagging and Social Media Activities Can Jeopardize Consumers’ Security While Travelling  

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
·       The survey challenges a misconception that millennials are least likely to leave their devices behind when on vacation— 47 percent of Singaporean millennials actually admitted that they were willing to unplug on vacation, while only 38 percent of respondents in their fifties would do so.
·       Many people that travel for work access or share financial data (12 percent), presentations (14 percent) or sensitive information (16 percent) while using public Wi-Fi.


The mid-year holidays are full of distraction and opportunity, and savvy criminals have learned how to capitalize on these moments. Travelers can be targets for cybercriminals who count on human and device vulnerabilities to provide them with a point of access to consumers’ data and devices. They can gain access to sensitive information via unsecured smartphones, laptops and even wearables, while also collecting data from social channels. 

“People depend on technology to stay connected to their physical and digital worlds – whether at work, home or while on vacation. They often use their personal devices on vacation to access sensitive data over potentially unsecured internet connections without considering the repercussions. It is imperative that we cultivate safe digital habits to ensure we stay safe online even when travelling.” said David Freer, Vice President Consumer Asia Pacific at Intel Security.

Unplugging as a concept
·      About 59 percent of Singapore respondents define being unplugged as having no internet usage at all or not using social media, while 40 percent said being unplugged means not making any phone calls.
·      The survey challenges a misconception in society that millennials would be the least likely to leave their devices behind on vacation— 47 percent of Singaporean millennials actually admitted that they were willing to unplug on vacation, while only 38 percent of respondents in their fifties would do so.

Connecting to the Internet on vacation
·      90 percent of Singapore respondents connect to the internet while they are on vacation.
·      65 percent of Singapore respondents use only Wi-Fi to connect to the internet, 3 percent use only the cellular network, and about one third (32 percent) use both.
·      When using Wi-Fi on vacation, 49 percent people use the hotel Wi-Fi. Slightly more than one out of three persons (38 percent) claim that they use any Wi-Fi that they can access.
·      Less than one third (29 percent) of Singapore respondents that use Wi-Fi on vacation make sure that the internet connection is secure before they use it. 31 percent claim that they don’t really think about the security of the connection, while 40 percent say that they think about it, but when they are badly in need of Wi-Fi they are willing to take the risk and use an unsecured connection.

Work-related use of the internet while travelling
·      Many people that travel for work access or share financial data (12 percent), presentations (14 percent) or sensitive information (16 percent) while using public Wi-Fi.
·      72 percent of that people that travel and work, say that they don’t access or share any business information on public Wi-Fi while traveling.

Consumers need to be vigilant and take precautionary security measures to prevent their personal information from being lost or stolen while on the road. Despite many respondents’ lack of success with unplugging, those who were able to unplug reaped major benefits.

Tips to Minimize Your Travel Security Risks:
  • Create Social Walls: We know how boring waiting in airports can be and often times this boredom can lead to posting updates from your mobile device. Whether it’s your location or that selfie where your hair looks just right, criminals are more able to monitor your whereabouts via social activity and take advantage of you when you have the weakest protection.
  • Be Careful When You Share: We love to share our experiences with friends and family via social media, but it’s important not to indicate publicly where or when you’ll be taking that relaxing vacation. Wait until you return home before posting all about it; otherwise, you could leave yourself open to would-be thieves who want to know when your home will be vacant.
  • Limit Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Use: Data can be expensive, but switching on Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when out and about can be a recipe for disaster. Connecting to unprotected Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices can expose your personal information to a cybercriminal. You should be especially careful when exchanging payment information. With this in mind, make sure to update your Bluetooth and Wi-Fi history by removing previously ‘remembered’ wireless networks, like ‘cafewifi.’
  • Check and Monitor Your Accounts: Keep an eye out for suspicious activity in your bank account history. If you aren’t meticulous about monitoring your activity, a criminal could have access to your accounts for quite some time before you are aware.

Find more information:
·      Blog post from Gary Davis: http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/unplugging-survey-2016
·      Join the conversation on social media with #unplugging
·      Visit the Intel Security Facebook page at facebook.com/intelsecurity and McAfee Security Advice Center for information on the latest consumer threats and online safety tips.

Study Methodology
In March 2016, Intel Security commissioned MSI International to conduct an online study in Singapore among 1,206 consumers between the ages of 21 to 54, evenly split by gender.

About Intel Security
Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone.  www.intelsecurity.com.  Intel Security is a division of Intel.

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